Vulgar: Language generator

Free form grammar

The free from grammar section allow you to completely override the randomly generated grammar. It also offers various formatting options:

# This is a heading

This is a heading

## This is a subheading

This is a subheading

**This is how to do bold text**

This is how to do bold text

*This is how to do italics*

This is how to do italics

/This will be in IPA friendly font/. [So will this]. But this won't.

/This will be in IPA friendly font/. [So will this]. But this won't.

<This represents spelling>.

This represents spelling.

Generating Affix tables

The following code generates a simple affix table. 1 = indicates that the table has just 1 axis. This line is indented to make it easier to read, but indenting is optional.

AFFIX TABLE
  1 = Singular Plural
END

To apply the affix to a word in the table write inflect = the word you want to pull from the dictionary:

AFFIX TABLE
  1 = Singular Plural
  inflect = dog
END

These affixes can now be used in the translator. The affix tag names will be the abbreviated to whatever is capitalized in the code. In this case they are S and P. But if you wrote 1 = SinGular PLural the affix tag names would be SG and PL.

Numbers may also be a part of the abbreviation, and, if necessary, underscores act as spaces. Example: 1st_person_Masculine would be 1M for the abbreviation, but it will show up neatly as "1st person masculine" in the table.

You can tell the program what the affix will actually be by calling these abbreviated names in the table.

AFFIX TABLE
  1 = SinGular PLural
  SG = -
  PL = -s
  inflect = dog
END

This mimics English affixes by making the plural an -s suffix, and SG = - actually indicates that the singlular should be no affix at all. You may specify all or just some of the affixes. There is a lot that can be done with custom affixes - see complete guide here.

It's possible that you might have an affix table for adjectives, and that adjectives have singular and plural affixs too. This is a problem for the translator, because it won't know if the PL tag refers to the plural affix for nouns or for adjectives. To get around this, use pos = to add a part of speech to every affix tag in the translator section:

AFFIX TABLE
  1 = SinGular PLural
  inflect = dog
  SG = -
  PL = -s
  pos = n
END

AFFIX TABLE
  1 = SinGular PLural
  inflect = happy
  SG = -o
  PL = -a
  pos = adj
END

Now NOUN and ADJ are added, deconflicting the tags:

A second axis can be added:

AFFIX TABLE
  1 = Masculine Feminine
  2 = SinGular PLural
END

And a third:

AFFIX TABLE
  1 = Masculine Feminine
  2 = SinGular PLural
  3 = NOMinative ACCusative DATive GENitive
END

Here's how you would specify what the masculine singular nominative affix is:

AFFIX TABLE
  1 = Masculine Feminine
  2 = SinGular PLural
  3 = NOMinative ACCusative DATive GENitive
  M.SG.ACC = -o
END

Word tables

To generate a table of words, change AFFIX to WORD. These words get automatically pushed into the main dictionary, so they should be given a part-of-speech using pos =:

WORD TABLE
  1 = Masculine Feminine
  2 = SinGular PLural
  pos = article
END

You can also specify what the word will be using the equals sign:

WORD TABLE
  1 = Masculine Feminine
  2 = SinGular PLural
  pos = article
  M.SG = el
  F.SG = la
  M.PL = los
  F.PL = las
END

You can even specify exactly what each word translates to in the dictionary using the > sign after the name:

WORD TABLE
  1 = Masculine Feminine
  2 = SinGular PLural
  pos = article
  M.SG > the (masculine singular definite article) = el
  F.SG > the (masculine singular definite article) = la
  M.PL > the (masculine singular definite article) = los
  F.PL > the (masculine singular definite article) = las
END